Category Archives: Mind Blowingly Awesome

Battle Royale (2000)

Battle_royale_pochette

Genre: Drama, Action/Adventure

Cast: Takeshi Kitano, Tatsuya Fujiwara, Aki Maeda

Synopsis: A class of teenagers are abducted and forced to take part in a military exercise where they must kill each other on a deserted island until only one is left…..so kind of like the hipster Hunger Games.

I remember when I was in high school, this was the cult film that everyone had to watch. I had managed to get my hands on a copy of the film and it ultimately got passed around the class like a soggy biscuit at Eton. At the time this film was released, it was shocking, harrowing, polarising, but unquestionably brilliant. After re-watching the film, I’ve come to the conclusion that it still is. It’s not brilliant solely because of its action, or its beauty, or its twisted sense humour. Battle Royale is brilliant because it manages to combine all these and turn a story about basic characters senselessly killing one another into a moving coming of age tale.

I think that the thing that gives Battle Royale its power is its characters. In total, there are about 43 that appear throughout the course of the movie. Creating a movie with that number of characters is a daunting task but the makers Battle Royale rose to the challenge admirably. Of course, many of the characters are killed off quickly but even characters that appear for one extended scene only are given their own unique personalities and quirks and histories. This is best seen with the character of Chigusa. In one scene the film establishes that she is an athlete, proud, fearless, and that she will kick the ass (and knife the balls) of anyone who attempts to rape her. The audience barely knows her and yet we end up respecting and liking her immensely, which makes her exit from the film all the more tragic and beautiful.

ChigusaRIP you super fierce bi-atch

Of course there are other characters that are wonderful. Takeshi Kitano’s character adds depth and a much needed adult perspective. I have the biggest crush on Hiroki and, when commenting on the characters, it’s hard not to give attention to Mitsuko Souma, the school hussy. In short, the film presents a myriad of complex characters and it makes you feel for them even though not a lot time is dedicated to them. One character in particular only gets a couple of minutes of screen time but she is easily one of the best in the whole film.

BR Lady“You’ve been selected to kill each other. CONGRATULATIONS!”

One of the other brilliant things about this film is that it encourages its audience to engage their imagination and ponder about what they would do if they were forced to enter into a fight to the death. What would you do? Would you hide or would you play the game? What sort of weapon would you want to get? A gun or something like a tracking device that allows you to avoid the competition? Very few films manage to draw in their audiences in such a way right off the bat but Battle Royale manages to do it without even trying. Maybe it’s because the general premise of the film is so fucked up or maybe the film appeals to some innate competitive survival instinct in every human. Whatever the reason, this is one film you will not stop watching halfway through. You will force yourself to watch it all the way to the end.

In recent years some people have debated whether The Hunger Games is a rip off of Battle Royale. For the record, I am going to say that I don’t think The Hunger Games is a rip off. Although I think the two share similarities, I think it would be fair to say that The Hunger Games has its own distinct features and themes. While Battle Royale is about growing up and leaving behind childhood friends, The Hunger Games is (I think) more of commentary on wealth inequality and reality television and it is enjoyable in its own way. Don’t get me wrong though, I think Battle Royale is 1000 times better and you would be a fool for thinking otherwise.

High-lights:

  • Wonderful characters that are developed in a very small amount of time.
  • Surprisingly good amount of humour.
  • Great soundtrack.
  • The lighthouse shoot out is one of the weirdest and most spectacularly perverse scenes in the history of film.
  • RUN!

Downers:

  • Kazuo Kiriyama is the only underdeveloped character and it’s a shame because in the novel his background is fascinating.

Summary:

I have no doubt that Battle Royale will continue to be a cult favourite for decades to come. It has all the ingredients needed to ensure its survival as a classic. If you haven’t seen it yet then hop to it. It’s on Netflix so there is no excuse.

10/10

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Filed under Action/Adventure, Drama, Mind Blowingly Awesome

Jackie Brown (1997)

Jackie Brown

Genre: Drama, Thriller

Cast: Pam Grier, Samuel L. Jackson, Robert Forster, Robert De Niro

Synopsis: An aging flight attendant gets caught smuggling money into the US for a gun-runner. Unfortunately, some coke was hidden with the money. She then becomes the central figure in a plot to deceive both the dealer and the cops.

I have a theory that you can instantly tell what a person is like based on what their favourite Tarantino movie is. After more than twenty years in the industry, Tarantino has produced a diverse filmography that not only caters to his own individual style but also to the varied tastes of his audience. For the aesthetes, you have the visual glory of Kill Bill. For the experimental, you have the intoxicating effect of Pulp Fiction. And for those who love boobs and cars, you have Death Proof. My favourite Tarantino movie, however, is one of his least well-received: Jackie Brown. This film is for those who love complex characters and those who give greater weight to substance as opposed to style.

That’s not to say that Jackie Brown is lacking in style because it’s not. On the contrary, the film is chock-full of gorgeous camera work and the hallmarks of a traditional Tarantino film (think rapid and sharp conversation, a soundtrack that is on point, and feet). What I mean to say is that Jackie Brown feels like a more mature and a more subdued version of a Tarantino film. It is a film that functions as a character study and, for the majority of its duration, the audience is left to observe the complexities the central characters. Other Tarantino staples, such as ultra-violence and general fucked-up-ness, take a back-seat.

It would be impossible to write this review without saying anything about Pam Grier. Let’s just get one thing straight: I love that girl with all my heart. I remember the first time I saw Coffy. I knew it was love right away. Any woman who dumps a salad bowl on a cracker bitch and is smart enough to hide razor blades in her weave automatically wins my respect.

In Jackie Brown, Grier delivers a nuanced performance and gives Jackie layers. We see her character’s strength, her intelligence, her wit, and also her vulnerability. As the film progresses, the audience’s affectation and admiration for her grows and, by the end, we are all rooting for her. She is a character we can all respect and one we can all identify with on some level. Grier is not the only one who delivers a stellar performance. Robert Forster and Samuel L. Jackson both give it their all, Forster as a love-struck bondsman and Jackson as the ruthless gun-runner Ordell. In fact, I would say that this is Jackson’s best performance ever. While some may prefer his role in Pulp Fiction, I think it’s this film that allows him to display his range: he’s funny, quick, and terrifying all at the same time. Plus, the man gets props for putting a bullet in one of the most annoying fuckers in the galaxy.

Ruby RhodBZZZZZZZZZZZZZ!!!!

To be frank, you can’t go wrong with this movie. I’m having a difficult time picking out anything I actively disliked. This is simply Tarantino at his finest.

High-lights:

  • Pam Grier kicking ass.
  • Samuel L. Jackson with the rattiest looking weave I have ever seen.
  • A well-paced and developed storyline that isn’t going to make you say: “say wut???”
  • The hooker dancing to The Supremes was hysterical.
  • A lovely ending: bitter-sweet with just the right amount of romance.
  • Killer soundtrack.

Downers:

  • Sharonda the rock ho is pretty depressing.

Summary:

If this is a Tarantino film you have yet to see then you are in for a treat my friend. It’s got top-notch characters, acting, writing, the whole shebang. Plus, it’s on Netflix. I’m almost tempted to give you my log in details just so you can watch it now.

10/10

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Filed under Drama, Mind Blowingly Awesome, Thriller

The Girl Who Became Three Boys (2012)

Genre: Documentary, Comedy, Drama

Cast: Real people from the deepest and darkest corners of the British Isles.

Genre: A documentary about a psychopathic girl who used social media trickery to become three different boys and seduce two clueless friends.

I’m not the biggest documentary watcher. When I watch movies I like to enjoy a sense of escapism, which is something that is mostly absent from documentary films. However, I do like to break this rule every now and then. Considering it’s my first proper post of the new year, I thought I would break tradition by writing about my favourite documentary, which aired on the UK’s channel 4 in 2012. For those of you who do not live in the UK, channel 4 documentaries are legendary because more often than not they take the piss out the subjects of the film. Channel 4’s editors are true visionaries who seem to have adopted a motto that humour can be found in every story, even the most tragic. Plus, the documentaries often have ridiculous topics like dogging or children past the age of five who still breast-feed.

The Girl Who Became Three Boys is the tragic and (surprisingly) true story of Gemma Barker, a girl who managed to seduce two of her straight friends. In this day and age, a gay person seducing a straight person is hardly news-worthy. Hell, I did it once or twice in my college days. What is so shocking about the Gemma Barker case is the way she seduced her friends. There were no drugs involved thankfully. What she did instead was create three different boys using Facebook and social media and then used those boys to get close to the two girls in question. Basically, she was a catfish. But it gets even more twisted when you find out that the two girls actually met the ‘boys’ and started serious relationships with them. How did they not know they were dating their female friend? Lord knows because she adopted a disguise every bit as complicated and rigorous as the disguises used by Sailor Moon and the Sailor Scouts.

sailor-moon-wallpaper-hd-13-770047“These colourful and suggestive outfits will totally keep our identities hidden!”

Looking at it objectively, it is a really fucked up situation. This girl manipulated her friends, toyed with their emotions, and allegedly assaulted them. Then again the series of events is so bizarre and unusual, you would be forgiven for thinking it was the plot to a Shakespearian farce. The documentary capitalises on the inherent WTF-ness of the story and heightens it by using CGI re-enactments, the kind favoured by that Taiwanese news show, and also animated collage poster boards. You may think it was a dirty move on the part of the filmmakers to do this and to make light of a tragic situation but, after seeing interviews with the victims, you kind of feel as though it was actually the sensible thing to do.

The filmmakers manage to interview the two victims and one of them, very sensibly, decides to remain anonymous and her face is never shown. The other one…..well….let’s just say she wasn’t as smart. She comes on to the show and, bold as brass, details everything about the incident…and I mean EVERYTHING. The stuff she says is just unbelievable. Through gentle questioning from the filmmakers, you find out that she never actually saw the guy/girl’s full face because he/she always obscured it with a hat or a hoodie, and he/she never spoke to the victim. Instead, he/she used to type messages on his/her phone and then show the victim….while they were stood next to each other.

wut

As the documentary progresses, you begin to question whether it is actually a piss-take but I assure you it is not. This is all true and there’s even a Wikipedia page dedicated to the case. I urge you to watch this documentary online (if you can find it) for two reasons. First, it’s a great example of how to make a documentary that entertains as much as it educates. Secondly, it’ll make you feel much better about yourself because you’ll come to realise that you will never be as clueless as the people in this documentary.

High-lights:

  • So much WTF.
  • “She was so clever!” No. She really wasn’t.
  • Surprisingly quotable…”He gave me pleasure.”
  • British humour at its finest…and most sardonic.

Downers:

  • It must have been a very traumatic experience for the victims.

Summary:

If you watch one documentary this year, please let it be this one. It is so ridiculous and so memorable you will be talking about it for days. It is available in some corner of the internet so there is no excuse not to watch it.

10/10

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Filed under Comedy, Drama, Mind Blowingly Awesome

Akira (1988)

AKIRA_(1988_poster)

Genre: Sci-Fi, Animation, Action/Adventure

Cast: TETSSSSUUUUOOOOOO!!!, KANEDAAAAA!!!!

Synopsis: A teenager who is also a member of a biker gang in dystopian Neo-Tokyo acquires psychic powers after a run in with an anaemic child. With his new powers, he sets out to release the mysterious entity known as Akira.

I’m back! That’s right loyal readers. I have returned to you after a five week sojourn to the USA. It must have been very difficult for you to process my absence. Lord knows it kept me awake at night. I am sure you have asked yourself, fist shaking at the sky: “Why did Baked leave us?” The simple truth is I decided not to update my blog while I was in the US for one key reason: I didn’t have access to weed. I didn’t want to compromise the integrity of my method…if ‘integrity’ is the right word. I would hate myself if I didn’t stay true to the basic tenets of this blog; namely get high and watch movies. Fortunately, I am back in London where the weed is plentiful and the police don’t give a rat’s ass. For my first review back, I’ll be reviewing the anime sci-fi mind-fuck classic: Akira.

If you thought Paprika and Perfect Blue were bat-shit insane, then you were right. However, as Japanese game shows have demonstrated, there is no limit to the sanity black hole that is Japan. Akira is a film that reflects that generality. The film is set in a dystopian Tokyo in 2019, 31 years after a nuclear explosion destroyed the city. The city is overrun with juvenile delinquents on bikes and nut jobs. Throw in psychic sickly children who look like they’re 80 and things get weird very quickly. I’m talking giant killer teddy bears and an oversized throbbing tumour monster. For the last one, imagine an inappropriate Power Ranger villain but with added sexual symbolism.

Zedd2Although I always thought Lord Zedd was inappropriate for that reason

Although the weirdness is certainly a hallmark of the film, the thing that makes Akira a brilliant film is that it speaks to sentiment that is 100 per cent Japanese. To date, Japan remains the only nation that has had a nuclear weapon used against it in war. In 1945, two Japanese cities were wiped off the map. Akira is a film that is very theme heavy with the central ones being: the fragility of civilisation and cities; the repercussions of using God-like powers for destruction; capitalism and urban wealth inequality; adolescence and coming-of-age; and spirituality and rebirth in the modern age. When watching this movie for the first time, these themes may escape you because it’s such a complex movie and that’s nothing to be ashamed of. I watched Akira for the first time when I was 15 and only ‘got it’ when I was 22. However, it’s still worth the watch and the re-watch because the themes this movie tackles are still relevant for today’s world and will continue to be so for a long time. Also, let’s not forget that Japan is hosing the Olympic games in 2020 so I fully expect Akira to actually happen by that time.

The amazing thing about this movie is that it is over 25 years old and it still holds up by today’s standards. The animation is as fresh and remarkable as it was when it was first released. I don’t think anyone could ever dream of criticising how Neo-Tokyo was designed: it’s a sprawling metropolis with shining lights and gleaming towers as well as dark corners and decay. The level of detail is, quite frankly, astounding and no scene does the craftsmanship justice quite like this one.

While the visuals are just as amazing as they were in the 80s, the sound effects have maybe aged a bit. I mentioned something similar in my review of Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind. However, you can’t let these small blips ruin what is an otherwise brilliant film. My advice to you readers is that you should watch this film as soon as possible, as a US remake could be on the way. The remake has been in development hell for years but that could change soon so you’ll want to experience the original before Hollywood shits all over it by including heavy-handed 9/11 references and Milla Jovovich in a skin-tight cat suit.

High-lights:

  • The animation. Wow. That is all.
  • Complex but not without reason. The film is all about nuclear war, evolution, and spirituality in an age crippled with capitalism.
  • Probably the best representation of romance in an apocalyptic scenario. I always find it weird how people are always shagging each other at the end of the world in these sorts of films….surely the characters have other more important things on their mind…like not dying.
  • Watch it with a friend and assign roles so that one can shout ‘Tetsuo’ and the other one shout ‘Kaneda’ at appropriate moments.

Downers:

  • Poor Kaori. Poor, poor Kaori. She got clothes-lined by a guy on a motor bike. That’s got to hurt.
  • Slightly outdated sound effects.

Summary:

When you first watch this movie, you might not get it. In fact, you might hate it. However, I am begging you to come at Akira with an open mind and maybe a little context because if you do that you will see why it’s such an important moment in Japanese cinematic history. Sure it’s a weird film, but when that weirdness comes together with purpose it becomes art. That’s what this film is, pure and simple: it’s art.

10/10

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Filed under Action/Adventure, Animation, Mind Blowingly Awesome, Sci-Fi

Fatal Attraction (1987)

Fatal Attraction

Genre: Thriller

Cast: Michael Douglas, Glenn Close, Anne Archer

Synopsis: A loving husband and father has an affair with a crazy woman who just doesn’t know the meaning of “fuck off.”

I like to think that all good movies will have some kind of moral to learn, just like fairy tales do. For Fatal Attraction, the message behind the film is clearly: “don’t stick your dick in crazy.” This film has attracted something of a legendary status thanks, in part, to Close’s performance. Close portrays a lady who epitomises bat-shit insanity. But this is not regular bat-shit insanity, this is something else. This is a Sean-Young-stalking-Tim-Burton-in-a-Catwoman-outfit kind of cray.

Catwoman…yet it’s not quite as crazy as this kind of Catwoman

Close really does stand out in this film. It’s a blessing that this plot is super simple, because it really enables Close to take centre-stage and build a memorable and shocking performance that is all her own. It’s the kind of performance only two women in the world could have pulled off: Close and Meryl Streep (who could play a turd on the street and it would still be convincing and Oscar-nominated). Applause needs to go to Close for researching the role and bringing to it a believability. She didn’t go with an over-the-top kind of crazy like Ali Larter did in Obsessed. Close’s performance is more subtle: up until maybe the last 10 minutes or so, it feels as if you’re looking at a real-life human close to breaking point. Part of the fun is waiting for her to snap.

While Close’s performance dominates, the other actors put in a lot of effort that pays off too. Anne Archer plays little miss perfect Susie housewife and Douglas, again, plays a lead who is not supposed to be particularly likeable. Sure, he’s a loving father, but he fucks some publishing ho on the weekend. Why? Who knows! Maybe because his wife is so prim and proper and you know Close’s character is the sort of woman who will have anal sex before vaginal.

Glenn CloseIt’s the whore-ish red nails that gives it away

Another fun thing about this movie is how completely 80s it is. You all know how much I love the 80s. It was a decade full of craziness, a craziness that compliments the insanity of the main actress. Take Close’s hairstyle for instance. What kind of moron thought it would be a good idea to give Close a perm? It frames the weirdness of her face (my mum says it’s like a strip of face between an oversized forehead and chin). Not only that, she’s in shoulder pads for half of the movie and then they all go to a Japanese-themed party because culturally insensitive and patronising shin-digs were all the rage in 1987. God I wish I lived in the 80s. You could get away with so much shit back then.

High-lights:

  • Glenn Close’s performance is electric.
  • Glenn Close’s face is terrifying.
  • The tape recording Close gives to Douglas is hilarious. One minute she says she loves him, the next minute she’s calling him a fag. Clearly he’s not one if he banged you in the elevator.
  • The sex scenes are hysterical. What kind of skank-ho has sex in the sink while there’s dirty dishes in there? And why is she turning on the tap to wet her shirt? Just take it the fuck off!

Downers:

  • That’s a little girl!?
  • That poor rabbit…but it was a scary white one with red eyes so I guess it’s ok.

Summary:

This is a movie everyone should see at least once. It’s pretty much the perfect thriller: tense yet engrossing and very well-paced. Close’s performance drives this film but it’s not the only appealing quality. You can’t really go wrong with this one and, if you’re married, it’s a good tool to encourage fidelity. Nobody wants some frizzy-permed psycho bitch up in their grill boiling their pets and throwing acid at vehicles.

9.5/10

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Jaws (1975)

Jaws

Genre: Drama, Horror

Cast: Roy Scheider, Richard Dreyfuss, Robert Shaw

Synopsis: An island community popular with tourists is terrorised by a man-eating shark that refuses to go away.

If I had to name the one film that started my love affair with movies, it would be this one. I first remember watching this when I was five years old. Jaws was my grandmother’s favourite film and she never missed an opportunity to watch it. She was also of the opinion that a little fear never hurt anyone, even children, and she is therefore directly responsible for my crippling fear of the ocean and sharks.

shark-dogEven the cute ones

However, you have to hand it to her: he did have impeccable taste in movies. Jaws is not only one of the best scary movies, but it is also one of the greatest movies ever made. Period. Who can seriously look at this film and deny its excellence? It has everything: killer acting, killer sound, killer cinematography, a killer shark. It is, simply put, a recipe for success.

If there are two thing in this movie that do not get enough credit, it’s the writing and editing. Have any of you read the novel by Peter Benchley? It’s not terrible by any means but it’s trashy as hell. In addition to a subplot involving the mafia, there’s a storyline in which Hooper bangs chief Brody’s wife. The screenwriters (Benchley himself as well as Carl Gottlieb) did a magnificent job at cutting all the unnecessary baggage out of the film and at writing a film that kept the whole thing simple yet sharp.

While the screenwriters laid the foundations, Verna Fields’ masterful editing really gave the film its power. Despite being about a fucking enormous shark, the film does not show much of it…partly because the fake shark looked like a giant turd. Instead, the film toys with the audience’s imagination by revealing very little. We all know what the villain of the movie is so there’s no need to actually show it; our imaginations can fill in the blanks. In fact, it’s scarier if we don’t see the attack coming. It’s as if the shark is a force of nature, killing ruthlessly and then disappearing without trace. It’s no wonder the film won an Oscar for editing.

Credit has to go to the stellar cast but particular kudos should go to the three male leads: Scheider, Dreyfuss, and Shaw. The interesting thing about Jaws is that, while it is a horror film, it’s also a brilliant character study. Here you have these three men, all from different walks of life, facing off against a 25-foot monster and bringing their own flaws to the picture. Chief Brody is the underdog of the picture. He’s uneducated not only about the ways of the island and its inhabitants but also the shark and the ocean. Hooper, on the other hand, is a veritable expert on sharks and the ocean, but he’s naïve and he admires the shark, seeing it as a fascinating specimen. Quint, finally, is the captain Ahab of the picture: obsessed and reckless. The best parts of the film are when these three men interact with one another. It’s when they argue and it’s when they joke.

I could insert my own joke here but I’m not going to. Instead I am going to post this scene from the film. In my opinion, it’s of the greatest scenes in the history of cinema. This, without question, corroborates everything I have said in this post and displays why Jaws is truly one of the greatest films ever made.

High-lights:

  • Scary as hell. I still don’t go into the ocean.
  • Perfect acting, editing, sound, and cinematography.
  • The Indianapolis speech still gives me chills.
  • A film that shows the power of an audience’s imagination.

Downers:

  • The fake shark looks shit. I can’t get around that fact but this film was made in the 1970s. I’ve got to cut it some slack.

Summary:

What else is there to say? This film is about as perfect as a film could possibly be.

10/10

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The Goonies (1985)

The_Goonies

Genre: Kids, Action/Adventure, Comedy

Cast: Sean Astin, Josh Brolin, Corey Feldman

Synopsis: A group of kids go on an adventure to find the treasure of One-Eyed Willie, a legendary pirate.

I think everyone has that one film from childhood that they treasure above all other films. This film will be the one that is passed down from generation to generation. You will sit down with your kids, all huddled together on the couch, and put on that classic and all bask in its wonderfulness. For me, that one film is The Goonies. Quite simply, there is no better film that both adults and kids can enjoy.

I can’t exactly remember the first time that I saw this movie. In a way, I feel like The Goonies has always been a part of my life and I can see now how it has had an impact on me. It’s part of the reason why I really want to see the Oregon coastline and why I love those white wooden houses that just scream Americana. It’s also impacted my fashion sense (I own the type of yellow rain coat Mikey wears). Interestingly enough, watching the movie at 25 I can see how much it influenced my sense of humour. The humour in this film is crude and twisted but well-timed, sharp, and, in a way, nostalgic as it feels like comedy that belongs in a bygone-era of kids’ films. Hell, what sort of kids’ movie nowadays makes fun of childhood obesity!?

Truffle Shuffle

Advice I live by

It’s funny how my appreciation for the movie has changed with age. When I watch the movie now, I am taken back by the razor sharp script and the amazing performances given by the young cast. As a child, however, I fell in love with the film’s spirit of adventure. Here you had a group of friends setting off, facing danger, solving riddles, and narrowly avoiding death. It was the sort of life I dreamed of. Unfortunately, when you grow up in rural England the only real danger you face is needle sticks in the graveyard during the town’s annual gypsy festival.

Gypsy

Cross my palm with hepatitis

That sense of adventure and danger is exactly what kids’ films need nowadays. I read an article recently that suggested that The Goonies and E.T. were the perfect kids’ films because they presented a real and genuinely terrifying danger: death, abduction, torture and scientific experimentation. Modern kids’ movies don’t compare. While engaging a child’s sense of wonder, The Goonies and E.T. was able to keep audiences and kids at the edge of their seat by showing universal and innate fears. It’s also partly the reason why audiences became more emotionally involved in film and sympathised with the characters to a greater extent.

I have to say that I agree with this theory. I always forget that the villains, the Fratellis, try to stick a child’s hand into a blender. That’s about as fucked up it can possibly get. Moreover, the same kid gets locked up in a freezer and a car boot with a dead body, easily one of the funniest moments in the movie. I think that’s probably one of the greatest things about The Goonies: it never patronises its audience, even though the target audience is children aged about 10. It’s a movie for smart and precocious children. If you watched and loved this film as a child then I can almost certainly guarantee that you are awesome.

High-lights:

  • The best child acting I have ever seen in a movie and all the kids are likeable. Even the girl with the least screen-time has some cracking one-liners.
  • I love Chunk. The scene where he tells the Fratellis about all the bad things he has done is comedic genius.
  • Cyndi Lauper soundtrack!!! 80s awesomeness overload.
  • The seen in which Corey Feldman speaks Spanish to the maid is brilliant.
  • A wonderful sense of adventure that charms adults and kids alike.

Downers:

  • I honestly can’t think of any.

Summary:

In my mind, there is no greater movie more worthy of the “mind-blowingly awesome” label. This is a film that will always bring a smile to my face and I honestly can’t wait to share this movie with my children. If they dislike this movie then it’s off the orphanage with them. No child of mine will criticise The Goonies. I’m sure that won’t happen though. How can anyone criticise a movie that has a song from Cyndi Lauper in it?

10/10

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Filed under Action/Adventure, Comedy, Kids, Mind Blowingly Awesome